Green party: which shade are you?

green_party_header_bNo, not the election (although oh my goodness we haven’t had such a close run thing for years), but one of the most interesting colours to finally make it into fashion’s forebrain this year. After season upon season of blues (in everything from powder to cobalt) and pinks (from plums to pastels), it’s nice to see the humble green having a turn.

As an Autumn, I am a huge fan of green, but it’s a colour that I notice a lot of my clients lack confidence in tracking down. Because of green’s nature – a mix of yellow and blue – the tiniest shift in tone can easily drop it to one side or other of the seasonal lines, leaving lots of clients lacking in confidence in finding and wearing it

On a subconscious level, green is known as a calming, refreshing colour, associated with health and nature and new growth. So surely finding the right shade of green for you isn’t just useful, it’s a mood enhancer too! Kettlewell helpfully sorts your colours by season, making shopping for your perfect green a doddle, but out there in the big bad world, it can be helpful to have a little more guidance to help you find your perfect green. See below for my top tips on identifying your best green.

 

  • Spring – Bright and vibrant greens, full of colour and life. Spring greens can vary from the the lightest yellow greens of a new shoot or the inside of a lime, through to warm grassy shades. Don’t forget that your greens also encompass almost every shade of turquoise and aqua it’s possible to imagine. Don’t make the mistake of falling into the soft jade greens of the summer palette – too bluey and pastel for you – or the deeper blue greens of Winter when you are looking for those grassy shades. If it doesn’t look like sunlight is hitting your green, it’s probably not got enough yellow in it.green_party_spring
  • Summer – All shades of jade and duck egg, you need to make sure your greens don’t get too bright and turquoise or they will be too warm and turn you sallow. Stick instead to blue greens with a hint of sage about them, or deepest sea green – the lucite green from our 2015 Pantone colour trend report is perfect for you. Your biggest problem is drifting into the Autumn palette of saturated teals rather than your cooler softer blue-greens. The lightest pastel jade greens also work well for you, and can provide a light bright contrast to your deeper pinks and reds.green_party_summer
  • Autumn – a real ‘green’ palette, you have a whole range of greens. From this year’s catwalk favourite, olive green, to grass and lime greens and the deeper darker forest and pine greens. Olive greens are relatively easy to identify – if it is a muddy military sort of green of any shade, it’s got a 99% chance of belonging to your palette. Lime greens are also fairly safe – you want something with plenty of yellow in it, but not too pale and wishy washy (if it feels too pale and bright, it may well be – your limes are full of golden rather than pastel yellow tones). With your forest and pine greens, try not to slide into the dark blue-greens of Winter. Imagine the darkest leaves on a holly bush, compared to the lightest. The lighter ones will work for you, with their hint of yellow, but the darkest ones have taken on a firmly blue-green tint.green_party_autumn
  • Winter – Your greens are at maximum saturation, like the rest of your palette, whether they are bright emeralds or dark pine greens. Your emerald greens still need to be on the bluey side – if they have any hint of new spring growth about them rather than deep emerald jewels, they are too warm. Likewise, your darker greens need to have a blue undertone – exactly the opposite to our Autumns above, you can wear the deepest shades from the holly bush, but leave the new growth alone. Don’t forget iced aqua and green too – the palest, most barely there reflection of green trees on snow.green_party_winter

ps: if you found this post useful, you might also want to go and take a look at the ‘which navy?‘ post from last year, to help identify your best shade of navy blue.

 

2 comments

    1. If you visit http://www.kettlewellcolours.co.uk/season/autumn on the website, and click on a particular colour, you can see what items are available in that colour. We do have items in Forest Green and Pine Green, as well as Light and Dark Olive. We also suggest looking at Dark Khaki which is a good substitute for Olive – and Moss. Hope you find something you like!

      Love your blog by the way, lovely to see such gorgeous photos – particularly as it has just started to rain here!

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